Physical activity and sedentary behavior in adolescents with type 1 diabetes

Authors

  • Sara Fleet Michaliszyn,

    Corresponding author
    1. College of Nursing, University of Arizona, 1305 N. Martin Avenue, P. O. Box 210203, Tucson, AZ 85721-0203
    • College of Nursing, University of Arizona, 1305 N. Martin Avenue, P. O. Box 210203, Tucson, AZ 85721-0203
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    • Project Director.

  • Melissa Spezia Faulkner

    1. College of Nursing, University of Arizona, 1305 N. Martin Avenue, P. O. Box 210203, Tucson, AZ 85721-0203
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    • Gladys E. Sorensen Endowed Professor, Diabetes Research.


  • ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00686283.

  • This project was supported by a grant from the NIH/NINR 7R21 NR009267-02 (PI, Faulkner). We would also like to thank the volunteers for their participation. The authors do not have any conflict of interest to disclose.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to describe the associations between levels of physical activity measured by accelerometry and changes in fitness, body composition, lipids, and glucose control (i.e., glycosolated hemoglobin [A1C]) in a sample of 16 adolescents with type 1 diabetes participating in a personalized exercise program. More sedentary activity was associated with lower fitness and fat free mass and increased total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL-c), and triglycerides (p < .05). Greater amounts of moderate to vigorous activity were associated with higher fitness and fat free mass, and decreased total cholesterol, LDL-c, triglycerides, and A1C (p < .05). Findings support the beneficial effects of increased moderate activity and decreased sedentary behavior to reduce cardiovascular risks and improve glucose control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 33:441–449, 2010

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