Get access

Supporting mothering: Service providers' perspectives of mothers and young children affected by intimate partner violence

Authors

  • Nicole Letourneau,

    Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Nursing, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada
    • Faculty of Nursing, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada.
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Professor; Canada Research Chair in Healthy Child Development. Child Health Intervention and Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Studies Program, Research Fellow CRISP.

  • Catherine Young,

    1. Faculty of Nursing, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
    • CHILD Studies Program Manager/Project Director.

  • Loretta Secco,

    1. Faculty of Nursing, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Professor.

  • Miriam Stewart,

    1. Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Health Senior Investigator, Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research.

  • Jean Hughes,

    1. IWK Health Centre, Faculty of Nursing, Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Associate Professor/Scientific Appointment.

  • Kim Critchley

    1. Faculty of Nursing, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Dean and Professor.


  • We would like to thank the following individuals, institutions, and groups for their support and contributions throughout this project: Carmen Gill, Members of the Community Advisory Committee, and the research assistants who have helped with various aspects of this project, Cheryl McNeil, Julie Bull, Cheryl Rehill, Julie Campbell, Julie Bull, Karen Harroun, Patricia O-Neil, Leslie Reeves, Nancy Mahoney, Alison Forshner, Natalie Weigum, Jennifer Donovan, Justin Joschko, and Barry Watson.

Abstract

Although negative outcomes from intimate partner violence (IPV) are not inevitable, IPV is recognized to have profound negative effects on child development. We conducted a qualitative descriptive study of service providers' understandings of the impact of IPV on mothers, young children (birth to 36 months), and mother–infant/child relationships, and of the support needs of these mothers and young children. Service providers suggested that IPV negatively influenced caregiving and identified a pressing need for information and strategies to help mothers promote and protect their young children's development. Although service providers struggled to articulate ideal forms of assistance to promote maternal–infant/child relationships, they agreed that mothers and young children experiencing IPV required more support than is currently available. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 34:192–203, 2011

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary