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Family caregivers of hospitalized adults in Israel: A point-prevalence survey and exploration of tasks and motives

Authors

  • Gail K. Auslander

    Corresponding author
    1. Paul Baerwald School of Social Work and Social Welfare, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mt. Scopus, Jerusalem, Israel
    • Paul Baerwald School of Social Work and Social Welfare, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mt. Scopus, Jerusalem 91905, Israel.
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    • Zena Harman Professor of Social Work.


  • The author wishes to acknowledge the contribution of Dr. Yifat Chen, Prof. Zvi Gilula, and Ms. Adina Marx.

Abstract

The prevalence of family inpatient caregiving in Israel, its extent, content, and related caregiver and patient variables were examined. Of 1,076 patients surveyed, 744 (69%) had family caregivers, and 513 caregivers were interviewed. Caregivers averaged 8 hours a day at the hospital and most frequently carried out monitoring tasks. Their main motivation was the desire to help the patient. Variables that explained overall caregiving tasks were the desire to help the patient (β = .38), to ensure quality of care (β = .19) and external pressure (β = .19). Variables that explained number of hours spent in caregiving were patient's age (β = −.28) and caregiver motivation related to benefits (β = −.19) and separation concerns (β = .18). Staff should identify caregivers, assess their motivations, and help determine appropriate tasks. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 34:204–217, 2011

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