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Recruitment and enrollment of caregivers for a lifestyle physical activity clinical trial

Authors

  • Caryn D. Etkin,

    Corresponding author
    1. College of Nursing, Rush University Medical Center, 600 S. Paulina St., 1080 AAC, Chicago, IL 60612
    • College of Nursing, Rush University Medical Center, 600 S. Paulina St., 1080 AAC, Chicago, IL 60612.
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    • Assistant Professor.

  • Carol J. Farran,

    1. College of Nursing, Rush University Medical Center, 600 S. Paulina St., 1080 AAC, Chicago, IL 60612
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    • Professor and The Nurses Alumni Association Chair in Health and the Aging Process.

  • Lisa L. Barnes,

    1. Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Chicago IL
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    • Associate Professor of Neurological Sciences and Behavioral Sciences.

  • Raj C. Shah

    1. Rush Memory Clinic, Chicago, IL
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    • Assistant Professor and Director.


  • Special thanks to our collaborators with the Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center (National Institute of Aging [NIA] grant no. P30 AG010161 and the Illinois Department of Public Health), the Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, and Nina L. Savar, GIS Coordinator, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs.

Abstract

This article presents the efficacy of the recruitment framework used for a clinical trial with sedentary family caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's disease. An integrated social marketing approach with principles of community-based participatory research provided the theoretical framework for organizing recruitment activities. This multi-pronged approach meant that caregivers were identified from a range of geographic locations and numerous sources including a federally funded Alzheimer's disease center, health care providers, community based and senior organizations, and broad-based media. Study enrollment projections were exceeded by 11% and resulted in enrolling n = 211 caregivers into this clinical trial. We conclude that social marketing and community-based approaches provide a solid foundation for organizing recruitment activities for clinical trials with older adults. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 35:70–81, 2012

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