Fatherhood intervention development in collaboration with African American non-resident fathers

Authors

  • Wrenetha A. Julion,

    Corresponding author
    1. Rush University College of Nursing, 600 S. Paulina, Suite 1080, Chicago, IL 60612-3873
    • Rush University College of Nursing, 600 S. Paulina, Suite 1080, Chicago, IL 60612-3873
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    • Associate Professor.

  • Susan M. Breitenstein,

    1. Rush University College of Nursing, 600 S. Paulina, Suite 1080, Chicago, IL 60612-3873
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    • Assistant Professor.

  • Donald Waddell

    1. Rush University College of Nursing, 600 S. Paulina, Suite 1080, Chicago, IL 60612-3873
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    • Project Director.


  • The authors deeply appreciate the selfless participation of the fathers who participated in the Fathers Advisory Council. We also gratefully acknowledge Drs. JoEllen Wilbur, Deborah Gross, Joyce Keithley, Janet Engstrom, and Chandice Covington for their thoughtful critique, helpful feedback, and ongoing encouragement. This research was supported by the NIH/NINR Grant 1RO1NRO11182-01.

Abstract

Because interventions developed in partnership with African American fathers not residing with their children are virtually non-existent, existing interventions fail to address the multiple factors that constrain these fathers' positive involvement with their children. We developed a videotape fatherhood intervention: Building Bridges to Fatherhood. In collaboration with a Fathers Advisory Council composed of 12 African American fathers, we used Aranda's framework for community-based nursing intervention development to design the intervention. Data from 13 focus group meetings show Advisory Council members' insights on program structure and content, fathers' commitment to their children and communities, and the benefits they garnered from Council participation. The implications for involving fathers in intervention development include using relevant language, vernacular, and interpersonal interactions. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 35:490–506, 2012

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