Modifying a social problem-solving program with the input of individuals with intellectual disabilities and their staff

Authors

  • Sarah H. Ailey,

    Corresponding author
    1. Rush University Medical Center College of Nursing, 600 S. Paulina St. #1080, Chicago, IL 60612
    • Rush University Medical Center College of Nursing, 600 S. Paulina St. #1080, Chicago, IL 60612
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Associate Professor.

  • Tanya R. Friese,

    1. Rush University Medical Center College of Nursing, 600 S. Paulina St. #1080, Chicago, IL 60612
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Faculty Practice and Outreach.

  • Arthur M. Nezu

    1. Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Distinguished University Professor of Psychology, Professor of Medicine, and Professor of Community Health & Prevention.


  • This study was funded by Rush University Medical Center College of Nursing Fund (#31202). This project was supported by the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS), Award Number UL1RR029879 from the National Center for Research Resources. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Center for Research Resources or the National Institutes of Health.

  • The authors wish to thank Arlene Miller, PhD RN FAAN, JoEllen Wilbur, PhD APN FAAN, and Julia Cowell, PhD RN FAAN for their assistance in this work.

Abstract

Social problem-solving programs have shown success in reducing aggressive/challenging behaviors among individuals with intellectual disabilities in clinical settings, but have not been adapted for health promotion in community settings. We modified a social problem-solving program for the community setting of the group home. Multiple sequential methods were used to seek advice from community members on making materials understandable and on intervention delivery. A committee of group home supervisory staff gave advice on content and delivery. Cognitive interviews with individuals with intellectual disabilities and residential staff provided input on content wording and examples. Piloting the program provided experience with content and delivery. The process provides lessons on partnering with vulnerable populations and community stakeholders to develop health programs. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 35:610–623, 2012

Ancillary