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Preterm infants' biobehavioral responses to caregiving and positioning over 24 hours in a neonatal unit in Taiwan

Authors

  • Jen-Jiuan Liaw,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Nursing, National Defense Medical Center, 161 Sec. 6 Mingchuan E. RD, Neihu 114, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC
    • School of Nursing, National Defense Medical Center, 161 Sec. 6 Mingchuan E. RD, Neihu 114, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC
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    • Associate Professor.

  • Luke Yang,

    1. Department of Social Welfare, Hsuan Chuang University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, ROC
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    • Assistant Professor.

  • Yi-Ming Hua,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, National Defense Medical Center, & Tri Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC
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    • Assistant Professor.

    • Neonatologist, Department of Pediatrics.

  • Pei-Wen Chang,

    1. Chang Tai General Hospital, Nursing Department, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC
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    • Lecturer.

  • Chi Chen Teng,

    1. Department of Nursing, Taichung Armed Forces General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC
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  • Chia-Chi Li

    1. School of Nursing, National Defense Medical Center, 161 Sec. 6 Mingchuan E. RD, Neihu 114, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC
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    • Lecturer.

    • Lecturer, School of Nursing.


  • The investigators wish to express their deepest appreciation to all of the participants and their parents in this study. We also thank National Science Council of Taiwan, ROC for grant support [NSC 97-2314-B-016-020-MY2 (097M0234)]. Also, thanks would be extended to Dr. Susan Tucker Blackburn, Faculty of the School of Nursing at University of Washington, who taught us how to observe infant behaviors. Finally, we extend thanks to the assistance from nurses in the neonatal units at Tri-Service General Hospital.

  • Ethical approval: Human subjects approval was obtained from Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defence Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

This prospective, descriptive study used a repeated-measures design to explore preterm infants' biobehavioral responses to 24-hour neonatal caregiving and positioning, and the factors associated with changes in their biobehavioral responses. Thirty preterm infants (gestational age 27.6–36.1 weeks) were observed for 3 days to record biobehavioral responses. Infants' disorganized behaviors increased as caregiving intrusiveness and supine positioning increased. Social interactions did not lead to increases in infants' disorganized behaviors, but to increased regulatory behaviors. Non-nutritive sucking (NNS), and prone positioning reduced occurrences of infant disorganized behaviors. Routine caregiving increased instability of oxygen saturation, but lateral and prone positioning improved physiological stability. Clinicians can appropriately provide NNS, positioning, and social interactions to promote biobehavioral stability. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 35:634–646, 2012

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