Individual, family, social, and cultural predictors of depressed mood in former soviet immigrant couples

Authors

  • Arlene M. Miller,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Community, Systems, and Mental Health Nursing, Rush University, Chicago, IL
    • Department of Community, Systems, and Mental Health Nursing, Rush University, Chicago, IL
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    • Professor and Department Chair.

  • Olga Sorokin,

    1. Chicago Health after Immigration (CHAI) Project, Rush University, Chicago, IL
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    • Project Director.

  • Louis Fogg

    1. Department of Community, Systems, and Mental Health Nursing, Rush University, Chicago, IL
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    • Associate Professor.


  • This study was funded by a grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and National Institutes of Health, # R01 HD38101.

Abstract

Gender differences in predictors of depression for married couples from the former Soviet Union were examined in a cross-sectional, descriptive analysis. Data were collected during a longitudinal study of post-migration health and adaptation. The sample included 308 men and women (154 couples), ages 40–79, who had lived in the US for an average of 6 years. Generativity, marital satisfaction and communication, social support, immigration challenges, and alienation were independent predictors of depressed mood. A gender interaction was found for generativity, indicating that diminished opportunities to guide the next generation and be productive members of society may have been more depressing for women. Interventions should attend to gender differences in developmental needs, reduce immigration-related challenges, and strengthen family and social support. Res Nurs Health 36:271–283, 2013

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