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Women Veterans' Preferences for Intimate Partner Violence Screening and Response Procedures Within the Veterans Health Administration

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  • The research reported here was supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration, Health Services Research and Development (HSR&D) as part of Dr. Iverson's HSR&D Career Development Award (CDA-2 10-029), and by the Lynne Stevens Award from Boston University School of Medicine awarded to Dr. Iverson. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs or Boston University.

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant health issue faced by women veterans, but little is known about their preferences for IPV-related care. Five focus groups were conducted with 24 women Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patients with and without a lifetime history of IPV to understand their attitudes and preferences regarding IPV screening and responses within VHA. Women veterans wanted disclosure options, follow-up support, transparency in documentation, and VHA and community resources. They supported routine screening for IPV and articulated preferences for procedural aspects of screening. Women suggested that these procedures could be provided most effectively when delivered with sensitivity and connectedness. Findings can inform the development of IPV screening and response programs within VHA and other healthcare settings. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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