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Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the relationships of undergraduate academic and admission test performance with graduate academic performance. Results could aid in selecting health services administration students in the future. The sample included 139 students (40 women and 99 men) entering seven health services administration programs during the fall of 1975 and graduating during the spring and summer of 1977. Participating programs were located in the Midwest, Northeast, South, and West Coast. Independent variables included undergraduate academic performance and admission test scores, while the dependent variable was graduate academic performance and admission test scores, while the dependent variable was graduate academic performance. Correlation analyses revealed that: (a) the verbal and quantitative subtest scores of the GRE were related to most aspects of graduate academic performance for men but only to selected aspects for women, (b) performance on the MAT was related to women's graduate academic performance in quantitative courses, and (c) men's and women's composite undergraduate grade point average was not related to composite graduate grade point average. These findings suggest that some of the standardized tests presently employed as admission screening devices should be used judiciously.