Perceived job stress, job satisfaction, and psychological symptoms in critical care nursing

Authors

  • Jane S. Norbeck R.N. DNSc

    Corresponding author
    • University of California at San Francisco, School of Nursing, Department of Mental Health and Community Nursing, Room N505-Y, San Francisco, CA 94143
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    • Dr. Jane S. Norbeck is an associate professor and chair of the Department of Mental Health and Community Nursing, College of Nursing, University of California at San Francisco.


Abstract

This study tested the relationships among perceived job stress, job satisfaction, and psychological symptoms of critical care nurses. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to a sample of 180 critical care nurses from eight hospitals. The results supported the hypotheses that higher levels of perceived job stress are related to lower levels of job satisfaction (r = -.24, p = .001) and to higher levels of psychological symptoms (r = .33, p = .000). These effects remained even when years of experience in nursing and shift were controlled. Item analysis, however, showed that four of the five top-ranking stressors were not related to the outcome measures. A distinction between positive and negative stressors is proposed to explain the pattern of results.

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