Determinants of turnover among nursing department employees

Authors

  • Dr. James P. Curry,

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    • Dr. James P. Curry is an assistant professor in the Graduate Program in Hospital and Health Administration, College of Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City.

  • Dr. Douglas S. Wakefield,

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    • Dr. Douglas S. Wakefield is a faculty associate, Graduate Program in Hospital and Health Administration, College of Medicine, University of Iowa.

  • Dr. James L. Price,

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    • Dr. James L. Price is a professor in the Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts, and the Graduate Program in Hospital and Health Administration, College of Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City.

  • Dr. Charles W. Mueller,

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    • Dr. Charles W. Mueller is a professor in the Department of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts, The University of Iowa, Iowa City.

  • Dr. Joanne C. McCloskey

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    • Dr. Joanne C. McCloskey is an associate professor in the College of Nursing, The University of Iowa, Iowa City. This article was received March 16, 1984


Abstract

A causal model of turnover, or quitting, among hospital nursing department employees was evaluated. This model includes job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and intent to leave as intervening variables that mediate 13 determinants of turnover. The sample consisted of 841 female nursing department employees selected from five hospitals in a western state. Attitudinal and background data were obtained through a mail questionnaire survey, and turnover was monitored for 18 months following the survey. Intent to leave had a strong direct effect on turnover while kinship responsibility, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment had indirect effects on turnover through intent to leave. Task repetitiveness, autonomy, promotional opportunities, and fairness of rewards were important determinants of jobs satisfaction and thus provide a mechanism whereby hospital management may enhance commitment to the organization while reducing turnover.

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