The use of lie scales in psychometric measures of children

Authors

  • Marie S. Brown Ph.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Financial Support for this study was provided by the Office of Research Development and Utilization, School of Nursing, The Oregon Health Sciences University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97201
    • School of Nursing, Department of Family Nursing — EJSN, Oregon Health Sciences University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97201
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  • Sheila M. Kodadek

    1. Financial Support for this study was provided by the Office of Research Development and Utilization, School of Nursing, The Oregon Health Sciences University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97201
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Abstract

The appropriateness of lie scales commonly used in psychometric tools for health research with children was investigated. A convenience sample of 74 children was used to test the hypothesis that children at a less mature stage of cognitive development would score higher on a lie scale than would children at a more mature stage. Each child was tested using the Cartoon Conservation Scale to assess the Piagetian cognitive level and the nine-item lie scale for the “How I Think and Feel Test”. The findings supported the hypothesis; a two-way analysis of variance showed a significant main effect of cognitive level (F = 13.274; p < 0.001). A stepwise multiple regression indicated that age and cognitive level accounted for 53% of the variance in lie scale scores.

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