Measures of mother-child interaction: A comparison of three methods

Authors

  • Dr. Louise H. Flick,

    Corresponding author
    1. Associate Professor of Nursing and Assistant Professor of Community Health, Saint Louis University
    • Saint Louis University School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, Missouri 63104
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Maryellen McSweeney

    Corresponding author
    1. Director of Research, School of Nursing, East Carolina University
    • Saint Louis University School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, Missouri 63104
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Three methods of recording mother-child interaction were compared in a sample of 136 adolescent mothers with children ranging in age from 8 to 27 months. Mother-child interaction was rated during in-home observations using Barnard's Teaching Scale, Schaefer's Attachment Inventory, and Clarke-Stewart's Rating Scales. The results indicate that each measure complements the other two, and that their interrelationships support the validity of the dimensions each describes. Yet, analyses indicate that they do not share common underlying factors. The findings suggest that each measure contributes to a more complete description of mother-child interaction.

Ancillary