Further exploration of maternal and paternal fetal attachment

Authors

  • Ramona T. Mercer,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Family Health Care Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143
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    • Ramona T. Mercer, PhD, FAAN, is a Professor; Sandra Ferketitch, PhD, and Jeanne DeJoseph, CNM, PhD, FAAN, are Assistant Professors; Katharyn May, DnSc, FAAN, is an Associate Professor; and Deanna Sollid is Project Director in the Department of Family Health Care Nursing, University of California at San Francisco.

  • Sandra Ferketich,

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    • Ramona T. Mercer, PhD, FAAN, is a Professor; Sandra Ferketitch, PhD, and Jeanne DeJoseph, CNM, PhD, FAAN, are Assistant Professors; Katharyn May, DnSc, FAAN, is an Associate Professor; and Deanna Sollid is Project Director in the Department of Family Health Care Nursing, University of California at San Francisco.

  • Katharyn May,

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    • Ramona T. Mercer, PhD, FAAN, is a Professor; Sandra Ferketitch, PhD, and Jeanne DeJoseph, CNM, PhD, FAAN, are Assistant Professors; Katharyn May, DnSc, FAAN, is an Associate Professor; and Deanna Sollid is Project Director in the Department of Family Health Care Nursing, University of California at San Francisco.

  • Jeanne DeJoseph,

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    • Ramona T. Mercer, PhD, FAAN, is a Professor; Sandra Ferketitch, PhD, and Jeanne DeJoseph, CNM, PhD, FAAN, are Assistant Professors; Katharyn May, DnSc, FAAN, is an Associate Professor; and Deanna Sollid is Project Director in the Department of Family Health Care Nursing, University of California at San Francisco.

  • Deanna Sollid

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    • Ramona T. Mercer, PhD, FAAN, is a Professor; Sandra Ferketitch, PhD, and Jeanne DeJoseph, CNM, PhD, FAAN, are Assistant Professors; Katharyn May, DnSc, FAAN, is an Associate Professor; and Deanna Sollid is Project Director in the Department of Family Health Care Nursing, University of California at San Francisco.


  • Data reported here are from the project “Antepartum Stress: Effect on Family Health and Functioning.”

Abstract

Fetal attachment of four groups of expectant parents were studied during the 24th to 34th weeks of pregnancy: 153 high-risk women hospitalized for a complication, 75 high-risk women's mates, 218 low-risk women, and 147 low-risk women's mates. No differences in fetal attachment scores were observed between high- or low-risk women or their mates; women scored significantly higher than their mates. Very little variance (7% to 14%) in fetal attachment was explained by the test of causal models except for high-risk women's mates for whom 31% of the variance was explained.

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