Blood pressure norms for healthy young adults: Relation to sex, age, and reported parental hypertension

Authors

  • William K. Hahn,

    Corresponding author
    • Requests for reprints can be addressed to Dr. William K. Hahn, Student Health Services, University of Tennessee, 1818 Andy Holt Avenue, Knoxville, TN 37996
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    • William K. Hahn, PhD, is a staff clinical psychologist in the Student Health Services, University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

  • Jo A. Brooks,

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    • Jo A. Brooks, DNS, is an associate professor in the School of Nursing, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana.

  • Richard Hite

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    • Richard Hite, MS, is a graduate student in clinical psychology at Purdue University.


Abstract

Blood pressure norms are presented for 1522 white, healthy, nonsmoking, normotensive 18 to 22-year-old men and women as a function of age and parental hypertension. Age effects were observed for diastolic blood pressure among males only. Parental hypertension was related to higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure among young women, and women with two hypertensive parents had higher systolic blood pressure than women with one hypertensive parent. The use of oral contraceptives is likely to have affected these results. Directions for future research are given.

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