Factors that contribute to pressure sores in surgical patients

Authors

  • Dr. Mildred G. Kemp,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of O.R. and Surgical Nursing, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center, 1653 W. Congress Parkway, Chicago, IL 60612
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Mildred G. Kemp, PhD, RN, ET, is an associate professor in the Rush College of Nursing and a practitioner/teacher in the Department of Operating Room and Surgical Nursing, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center. Joyce K. Keithley, DNSc, RN, is an associate professor in the Rush College of Nursing and Chairperson of the Department of Operating Room and Surgical Nursing, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center. David W. Smith, PhD, MPH, is the executive vice-president and a biostatistician at Michael Pine & Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL. Barbara Morreale, MSN, RN, is an instructor in the Rush College of Nursing and Director of Operating Rooms, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center.

  • Joyce K. Keithley,

  • David W. Smith,

  • Barbara Morreale


Abstract

In this prospective study examination was made of whether (a) time on the operating table, (b) proportion of intraoperative diastolic hypotensive episodes, (c) age, (d) preoperative serum albumin, (e) preoperative total protein levels, and (f) preoperative Braden scores could identify those patients who do and do not develop pressure sores during elective surgery. The stratified sample consisted of 125 adult patients. Fifteen patients (12%) developed a total of 23 pressure sores. A discriminant function using time on the operating table, extracorporeal circulation, and age emerged as the best predictor correctly classifying 12 of 15 patients who developed pressure sores and 83 of 110 patients who remained pressure sore free.

Ancillary