Clergy views on the marketing of the Church: insights from a UK survey

Authors

  • James F. Devlin,

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    1. Marketing Department, City University Business School, Frobisher Crescent, Barbican Centre, London, EC2Y 8HB, UK
    • Marketing Department, City University Business School, Frobisher Crescent, Barbican Centre, London, EC2Y 8HB, UK
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    • James Devlinis Lecturer in Marketing at City University Business School, London. After graduating from Loughborough University, he worked for a number of years for Lloyds Bank Private Banking in the area of fund management, as well as joining a project team concerned with the impact and implications of the Financial Services Act 1986. James has researched and published in the area of services marketing since joining the University of Nottingham in 1991 and recently completed his PhD, investigating single competitive markets and competitive advantage in retail financial services.

  • Ann Sherman

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    • Ann Shermanwas, until recently, Anglican Chaplain at the University of Nottingham and is now Associate Professor in the Department of Education at Saint Francis Xavier University, Canada. Ann was awarded a PhD in Early Childhood Education at the University of Nottingham and she has published widely on this topic. Her other main research interests include the marketing of the Church and the marketing of schools.


Abstract

The marketing of the Church, an example of social cause marketing, has been the subject of increasing attention in the academic literature. At the same time churches in the United Kingdom are increasingly seen to be engaging in what have been termed marketing activities. A small number of studies have investigated the degree to which clergy in the USA view the use of marketing techniques as acceptable and appropriate. This paper makes a contribution to the continuing debate surrounding the use of marketing in a church setting by presenting the results of a survey of UK clergy in which they are asked about the appropriateness of marketing activities in the church context. While results indicate a general acceptance of marketing techniques, there is less acceptance among the clergy of the need to develop, and appropriateness of developing, a marketing orientation or philosophy. Copyright © 1999 Henry Stewart Publications

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