Cause-related marketing and values in Australia

Authors

  • Fredric Kropp,

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    • Fredric Kropp,PhD (University of Oregon) is an assistant professor of Marketing at Bond University, in Gold Coast, Australia. He has published in Marketing Intelligence and Planning, the Journal of International Consumer Marketing, the Journal of Global Marketing, and Sport Marketing Quarterly. Prior to ob taining his PhD he was an economist involved in energy and transportation policy issues, international business, and market planning and forecasting. He has consulted for Fortune 500 companies, entrepreneurs and govern ment clients.

  • Stephen J. S. Holden,

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    • Stephen J. S. Holden,PhD (University of Florida) is an assistant professor in the Department of Marketing at Bond University, Gold Coast, Australia. In addition to being published in Advances in Consumer Research and the Journal of Brand Management, he has completed numerous research reports on public health and social issues for govern ment and non-government organisations in Australia, Canada, Europe and the USA.

  • Anne M. Lavack

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Administrative Studies, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Canada R3B 2E9
    • Department of Administrative Studies, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Canada R3B 2E9
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    • Anne M. Lavack,PhD (University of British Columbia) is an associate professor in the Department of Administrative Studies at the University of Winnipeg. She has published previously in the Journal of Public Policy and Marketing, Health Marketing Quarterly and the Journal of Product and Brand Management. Prior to obtaining her PhD she was an advertising executive involved in planning social marketing campaigns for government departments and nonprofit organisations.


Abstract

An investigation is conducted into attitudes towards cause-related marketing (CRM) among Australian consumers, with attention to the underlying differences in consumer values. It is found that those who place greater importance on values such as warm relationships, self-fulfilment and security are likely to have more positive attitudes towards CRM. In addition, females appear to have somewhat more positive attitudes towards cause-related marketing than males. Interestingly, the degree to which consumers are susceptible to interpersonal influence is not related to attitudes towards CRM. The implications are that cause-related marketing efforts are therefore best directed at females and those who value relationships, self-fulfilment and security. Efforts to support CRM through social influences (ie via compliance and conformity) would appear to be unlikely to succeed. Copyright © 1999 Henry Stewart Publications

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