Divergent neural substrates of inhibitory control in binge eating disorder relative to other manifestations of obesity

Authors

  • Iris M. Balodis,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
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    • Disclosures: The authors report that they have no financial conflicts of interest with respect to the content of this manuscript. Dr Potenza has received financial support or compensation for the following: Dr Potenza consults for and is an advisor to Boehringer Ingelheim; has consulted for and has financial interests in Somaxon; has received research support from the National Institutes of Health, Veteran's Administration, Mohegan Sun Casino, the National Center for Responsible Gaming and its affiliated Institute for Research on Gambling Disorders, and Forest Laboratories, Psyadon, Ortho-McNeil, Oy-Control/Biotie and Glaxo-SmithKline pharmaceuticals; has participated in surveys, mailings or telephone consultations related to drug addiction, impulse control disorders or other health topics; has consulted for law offices and the federal public defender's office in issues related to impulse control disorders; provides clinical care in the Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services Problem Gambling Services Program; has performed grant reviews for the National Institutes of Health and other agencies; has given academic lectures in grand rounds, CME events and other clinical or scientific venues; and has generated books or book chapters for publishers of mental health texts.

  • Nathan D. Molina,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
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  • Hedy Kober,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
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  • Patrick D. Worhunsky,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
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  • Marney A. White,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
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  • Rajita Sinha,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
    2. Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
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  • Carlos M. Grilo,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
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  • Marc N. Potenza

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
    2. Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
    3. Department of Neurobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
    • Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
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Abstract

Objective:

An important endeavor involves increasing our understanding of biobehavioral processes underlying different types of obesity. The current study investigated the neural correlates of cognitive control (involving conflict monitoring and response inhibition) in obese individuals with binge eating disorder (BED) as compared to BMI-matched non-BED obese (OB) individuals and lean comparison (LC) participants. Alterations in cognitive control may contribute to differences in behavioral control over eating behaviors in BED and obesity.

Design and Methods:

Participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing the Stroop color-word interference task.

Results and Conclusions:

Relative to the OB and LC groups, activity in the BED group was differentiated by relative hypoactivity in brain areas involved in self-regulation and impulse control. Specifically, the BED group showed diminished activity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and insula during Stroop performance. In addition, dietary restraint scores were negatively correlated with right IFG and vmPFC activation in the BED group, but not in the OB or HC groups. Thus, BED individuals' diminished ability to recruit impulse-control-related brain regions appears associated with impaired dietary restraint. The observed differences in neural correlates of inhibitory processing in BED relative to OB and LC groups suggest distinct eurobiological contributions to binge eating as a subgroup of obese individuals.

Ancillary