Insurer and employer views on pediatric obesity treatment: A qualitative study

Authors

  • S.E. Hampl,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of General Pediatrics, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics/University of MO-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, Missouri, USA
    2. Center for Children's Healthy Lifestyles and Nutrition, Kansas City, Kansas, USA
    • Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics/University of MO-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, Missouri, USA
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  • A.M. Davis,

    1. Center for Children's Healthy Lifestyles and Nutrition, Kansas City, Kansas, USA
    2. Department of Pediatrics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA
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  • M.L. Sampilo,

    1. Clinical Child Psychology Program, University of KS, Lawrence, Kansas, USA
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  • K.L. Stephens,

    1. Department of General Pediatrics, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics/University of MO-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, Missouri, USA
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  • K. Dean

    1. Department of Pediatrics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA
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  • Disclosure: The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

  • Funding agencies: Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City, National Institutes of Health to the second author (DK068221).

Abstract

Objective:

The effectiveness of group-based comprehensive, multidisciplinary (stage 3) pediatric weight management programs is backed by a growing body of literature, yet insurance coverage of these programs is scarce to nonexistent, limiting their reach and long-term survival. The objective of this study was to better understand the perspectives of insurers and large employers on the issue of group-based treatment coverage.

Design and Methods:

The authors performed a qualitative study utilizing structured interviews with these stakeholders, following accepted techniques.

Results:

Six major themes emerged: cost, program effectiveness, corporate social responsibility, secondary parental (employee) benefits, coverage options and new benefit determination.

Conclusion:

Future efforts to secure payment for group-based pediatric weight management programs should address these key themes.

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