Links of adolescent- and parent-reported eating in the absence of hunger with observed eating in the absence of hunger

Authors

  • Lauren B. Shomaker,

    1. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    2. Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology (MPS), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • Marian Tanofsky-Kraff,

    Corresponding author
    1. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    2. Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology (MPS), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    • Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology (MPS), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Bethesda, Maryland, USA. E-mail: mtanofsky@usuhs.edu

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  • Mira Mooreville,

    1. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • Samantha A. Reina,

    1. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • Amber B. Courville,

    1. Department of Nutrition, Clinical Center, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • Sara E. Field,

    1. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    2. Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology (MPS), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • Brittany E. Matheson,

    1. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    2. Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology (MPS), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • Sheila M. Brady,

    1. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • Susan Z. Yanovski,

    1. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    2. Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • Jack A. Yanovski

    1. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • Disclosure: The authors declared no conflict of interest.

  • Disclaimer: The opinions and assertions expressed herein are those of the authors and are not to be construed as reflecting the views of the U.S. Public Health Service, the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, or the U.S. Department of Defense.

  • Funding Agencies: NICHD National Research Service Award 1F32HD056762 and Career Development Award K99HD069516 (to L. Shomaker), NIDDK grant 1R01DK080906 and USUHS grant R072IC (to M. Tanofsky-Kraff), and NICHD Intramural Research Program grant ZIAHD000641 with supplemental funding from NIMHD and OBSSR (to J. Yanovski).

  • ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT00631644

Abstract

Objective

Eating in the absence of hunger (EAH) typically was assessed by measuring snack intake after consumption of a meal. There were no validated self-report measures of EAH. The relationship of adolescent self-report and parent-reported EAH to adolescents' measured intake in the absence of hunger was examined.

Design and Methods

Ninety adolescents completed the Eating in the Absence of Hunger Questionnaire for Children and Adolescents (EAH-C) to describe eating when not hungry. Parents described children's EAH on a parallel version designed for parents (EAH-P). In a randomized crossover study, adolescent EAH in response to external cues was measured as snack intake after a lunch meal standardized to provide 50% of daily energy requirements and after a large array (>10,000 kcal).

Results

Parents' reports of children's EAH in response to external cues were associated with greater EAH after both meals, adjusting for body composition, sex, age, race, puberty, and meal intake. Adolescent-reported EAH was unrelated or showed an inverse association with observed EAH.

Conclusions

Parent-reported EAH showed a positive association with adolescents' observed EAH and may be a useful research and clinical tool for assessing EAH in response to external cues in conditions when laboratory assessments are not feasible.

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