Weight loss can lead to resolution of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms: A prospective intervention trial

Authors

  • Mandeep Singh,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Kansas City, Missouri, USA
    2. Department of Gastroenterology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA
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  • Jaehoon Lee,

    1. Center for Research Methods and Data Analysis, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, USA
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  • Neil Gupta,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Kansas City, Missouri, USA
    2. Department of Gastroenterology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA
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  • Srinivas Gaddam,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Kansas City, Missouri, USA
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  • Bryan K. Smith,

    1. Center for Research Methods and Data Analysis, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, USA
    2. Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA
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  • Sachin B. Wani,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Kansas City, Missouri, USA
    2. Department of Gastroenterology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA
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  • Debra K. Sullivan,

    1. Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA
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  • Amit Rastogi,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Kansas City, Missouri, USA
    2. Department of Gastroenterology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA
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  • Ajay Bansal,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Kansas City, Missouri, USA
    2. Department of Gastroenterology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA
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  • Joseph E. Donnelly,

    1. Department of Energy Balance Laboratory, Center for Physical Activity and Weight Management, University of Kansas Medical Center, Lawrence, Kansas, USA
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  • Prateek Sharma

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Gastroenterology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Kansas City, Missouri, USA
    2. Department of Gastroenterology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA
    • Department of Gastroenterology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Kansas City, Missouri, USA; Department of Gastroenterology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA;
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  • Disclosure: Preliminary results of this study were presented as an oral presentation at Digestive Disease Week 2010, New Orleans, LA. The authors declared no conflict of interest.

  • See the online ICMJE Conflict of Interest Forms for this article.

Abstract

Objective:Weight gain is an important risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); however, whether weight loss can lead to resolution of GERD symptoms is not clear. Our aim was to measure the impact of weight loss on GERD symptoms.

Design and Methods:In a prospective cohort study at a tertiary referral center, overweight/obese subjects (BMI 25-39.9 kg/m2) were enrolled in a structured weight loss program. Weight loss strategies included dietary modifications, increased physical activity and behavioral changes. At baseline and at 6 months, BMI and waist circumference were measured and all participants completed a validated reflux disease questionnaire.

Results: A total of 332 adult subjects, mean age 46 years and 66% women were prospectively enrolled. At baseline, the mean body weight, BMI, and waist circumference were 101 (±18) kg, 35 (±5) kg/m2 and 103 (±13) cm. At 6 months, majority of the subjects (97%) lost weight (average weight loss: 13 ± 7.7 kg) and as compared with baseline, there was a significant decrease in the overall prevalence of GERD (15 vs. 37%; P < 0.01) and the mean GERD symptom score (1.8 vs. 5.5; P < 0.01). Overall, 81% of the subjects had reduction in GERD symptom scores; 65% had complete resolution and 15% had partial resolution of reflux symptoms. There was a significant correlation between % body weight loss and reduction in GERD symptom scores (r = 0.17, P < 0.05).

Conclusions: In conclusion, the overall prevalence of GERD symptoms is high (37%) in overweight and obese subjects. A structured weight loss program can lead to complete resolution of GERD symptoms in the majority of these subjects.

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