Eight-month postprogram completion: Change in risk factors for chronic disease amongst participants in a 4-month pedometer-based workplace health program

Authors

  • Rosanne Freak-Poli,

    Corresponding author
    1. Obesity & Population Health, BakerIDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
    • Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, the Alfred Centre, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
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  • Rory Wolfe,

    1. Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, the Alfred Centre, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
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  • Margaret Brand,

    1. Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, the Alfred Centre, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
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  • Maximilian de Courten,

    1. Copenhagen School of Global Health, University of Copenhagen, 1014 K⊘benhavn K, Denmark
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  • Anna Peeters

    1. Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, the Alfred Centre, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
    2. Obesity & Population Health, BakerIDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
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  • Author contributions: RFP takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis. RFP, MdC and AP undertook the study design and oversaw the data collection for the project. MB contributed towards the data collection. RFP, RW and AP contributed to the statistical data analysis. RFP, RW, MB, MdC & AP contributed to the critical interpretation of the data. All authors contributed to the final version of the article and have read, as well as, approved the final manuscript

  • Disclosure: The authors declared no conflict of interest.

  • Funding agencies: The authors acknowledge the Australian Research Council (ARC) and the Foundation for Chronic Disease Prevention™ in the Workplace, which is associated with the Global Corporate Challenge®, for partially funding this study. RFP is supported by an Australian Postgraduate Award and a Monash Departmental Scholarship. AP is funded by a VicHealth Public Health Fellowship.

Correspondence: Rosanne Freak-Poli (Rosanne.Freak-Poli@monash.edu)

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate whether participation in a 4-month, pedometer-based, physical activity, workplace health program is associated with long-term sustained improvements in risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, 8 months after the completion of the program.

Design and Methods

A sample size of 720 was required. 762 Australian adults employed in primarily sedentary occupations and voluntarily enrolled in a workplace program were recruited. Demographic, behavioral, anthropometric and biomedical measurements were completed at baseline, 4 and 12 months.

Results

About 76% of participants returned at 12 months. Sustained improvements at 12 months were observed for self-reported vegetable intake, self-reported sitting time and independently measured blood pressure. Modest improvements from baseline in self-reported physical activity and independently measured waist circumference at 12 months indicated that the significant improvements observed immediately after the health program could not be sustained. Approximately half of those not meeting guidelines for physical activity, waist circumference and blood pressure at baseline, were meeting guidelines at 12 months.

Conclusions

Participation in this 4-month, pedometer-based, physical activity, workplace health program was associated with sustained improvements in chronic disease risk factors at 12 months. These results indicate that such programs can have a long-term benefit and thus a potential role to play in population prevention of chronic disease.

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