Body adiposity index and all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality in men

Authors

  • Diego Moliner-Urdiales,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Education, University Jaume I, Castellón, Spain
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    • Funding agencies: This work was supported by “Conselleria de Educación de la Generalitat Valenciana” [BEST/2012/257]; Spanish Ministry of Education [EX-2010-1008]; National Institutes of Health [AG06945, HL62508, R21DK088195]; and in part by an unrestricted research grant from The Coca-Cola Company. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the funding institutions.

  • Enrique G. Artero,

    1. Area of Physical Education and Sport, University of Almería, Almería, Spain
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    • Funding agencies: This work was supported by “Conselleria de Educación de la Generalitat Valenciana” [BEST/2012/257]; Spanish Ministry of Education [EX-2010-1008]; National Institutes of Health [AG06945, HL62508, R21DK088195]; and in part by an unrestricted research grant from The Coca-Cola Company. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the funding institutions.

  • Duck-chul Lee,

    1. Department of Kinesiology, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, USA
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    • Funding agencies: This work was supported by “Conselleria de Educación de la Generalitat Valenciana” [BEST/2012/257]; Spanish Ministry of Education [EX-2010-1008]; National Institutes of Health [AG06945, HL62508, R21DK088195]; and in part by an unrestricted research grant from The Coca-Cola Company. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the funding institutions.

  • Vanesa España-Romero,

    1. MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge, UK
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    • Funding agencies: This work was supported by “Conselleria de Educación de la Generalitat Valenciana” [BEST/2012/257]; Spanish Ministry of Education [EX-2010-1008]; National Institutes of Health [AG06945, HL62508, R21DK088195]; and in part by an unrestricted research grant from The Coca-Cola Company. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the funding institutions.

  • Xuemei Sui,

    1. Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA
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    • Funding agencies: This work was supported by “Conselleria de Educación de la Generalitat Valenciana” [BEST/2012/257]; Spanish Ministry of Education [EX-2010-1008]; National Institutes of Health [AG06945, HL62508, R21DK088195]; and in part by an unrestricted research grant from The Coca-Cola Company. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the funding institutions.

  • Steven N. Blair

    1. Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA
    2. Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA
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  • Conflicts of interest statement: The authors declared no conflict of interest.

Correspondence: Diego Moliner-Urdiales (dmoliner@uji.es)

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the association of body adiposity index (BAI) with all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality risk.

Design and Methods

The current analysis comprised 19,756 adult men who enrolled in the Aerobics Centre Longitudinal Study and completed a baseline examination during 1988-2002. All-cause and CVD mortality was registered till December 31, 2003.

Results

During an average follow-up of 8.3 years (163,844 man-years), 353 deaths occurred (101 CVD deaths). Age- and examination year-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for all-cause mortality risk were higher for men with high values of BMI (HR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.19-2.23), waist circumference (1.55, 1.22-1.96), and percentage of body fat (%BF) (1.36, 1.04-1.31), but not for men with high values of BAI (1.28, 0.98-1.66). The HRs for CVD mortality risks were higher for men with high values in all adiposity measures (HRs ranged from 1.73 to 2.06). Most of these associations, however, became nonsignificant after adjusting for multiple confounders including cardiorespiratory fitness.

Conclusion

BAI is not a better predictor of all-cause and CVD mortality risk than BMI, waist circumference, or %BF.

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