Effects of sugar-sweetened beverages on plasma acylation stimulating protein, leptin and adiponectin: Relationships with Metabolic Outcomes

Authors

  • Reza Rezvani,

    1. Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Laval University, Québec, Quebec, Canada
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  • Katherine Cianflone,

    1. Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Laval University, Québec, Quebec, Canada
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  • John P. McGahan,

    1. Department of Radiology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California, USA
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  • Lars Berglund,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA
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  • Andrew A. Bremer,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA
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  • Nancy L. Keim,

    1. United States Department of Agriculture, Western Human Nutrition Research Center, Obesity and Metabolism, Davis, California, USA
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  • Steven C. Griffen,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA
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  • Peter J. Havel,

    1. Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, UCD, Davis, California, USA
    2. Department of Nutrition, UCD,, Davis, California, USA
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    • Disclosure: Dr. Havel and Dr. Stanhope have received travel funds and honoraria for presentations on the topic of the metabolic effects of sugar consumption at scientific conferences. They have also received honoraria for writing reviews on the topic of the metabolic effects of sugar consumption. Dr. Berglund receives consulting income from Danone Institute. The other authors have no disclosures or conflicts of interest to declare. Funding agencies: This research was supported with funding from NIH grant R01 HL-075675 and by CIHR (to KC). K. Cianflone holds a Canada Research Chair in Adipose Tissue. The project also received support from Grant Number UL1 RR024146 from the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and NIH Roadmap for Medical Research. Dr. Keim's research is supported by intramural USDA-ARS CRIS 5306-51530-016-00D. Dr. Havel has since received funding for further research on the metabolic effects of sugar consumption from NIH grants RO1 HL HL091333 and RO1 HL HL HL107256. Dr. Stanhope is supported by a Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health award (K12 HD051958) funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH), Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS), and the National Institute of Aging (NIA).

  • Kimber L. Stanhope

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, UCD, Davis, California, USA
    2. Department of Nutrition, UCD,, Davis, California, USA
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    • Disclosure: Dr. Havel and Dr. Stanhope have received travel funds and honoraria for presentations on the topic of the metabolic effects of sugar consumption at scientific conferences. They have also received honoraria for writing reviews on the topic of the metabolic effects of sugar consumption. Dr. Berglund receives consulting income from Danone Institute. The other authors have no disclosures or conflicts of interest to declare. Funding agencies: This research was supported with funding from NIH grant R01 HL-075675 and by CIHR (to KC). K. Cianflone holds a Canada Research Chair in Adipose Tissue. The project also received support from Grant Number UL1 RR024146 from the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and NIH Roadmap for Medical Research. Dr. Keim's research is supported by intramural USDA-ARS CRIS 5306-51530-016-00D. Dr. Havel has since received funding for further research on the metabolic effects of sugar consumption from NIH grants RO1 HL HL091333 and RO1 HL HL HL107256. Dr. Stanhope is supported by a Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health award (K12 HD051958) funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH), Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS), and the National Institute of Aging (NIA).


Abstract

Objective

The effects of fructose and glucose consumption on plasma acylation stimulating protein (ASP), adiponectin, and leptin concentrations relative to energy intake, body weight, adiposity, circulating triglycerides, and insulin sensitivity were determined.

Design and Methods

Thirty two overweight/obese adults consumed glucose- or fructose-sweetened beverages (25% energy requirement) with their ad libitum diets for 8 weeks, followed by sweetened beverage consumption for 2 weeks with a standardized, energy-balanced diet. Plasma variables were measured at baseline, 2, 8, and 10 weeks, and body adiposity and insulin sensitivity at baseline and 10 weeks.

Results

Fasting and postprandial ASP concentrations increased at 2 and/or 8 weeks. ASP increases correlated with changes in late-evening triglyceride concentrations. At 10 weeks, fasting adiponectin levels decreased in both groups, and decreases were inversely associated with baseline intra-abdominal fat volume. Sugar consumption increased fasting leptin concentrations; increases were associated with body weight changes. The 24-h leptin profiles increased during glucose consumption and decreased during fructose consumption. These changes correlated with changes of 24-h insulin levels.

Conclusions

The consumption of fructose and glucose beverages induced changes in plasma concentrations of ASP, adiponectin, and leptin. Further study is required to determine if these changes contribute to the metabolic dysfunction observed during fructose consumption.

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