Serological data analyses show that adenovirus 36 infection is associated with obesity: A meta-analysis involving 5739 subjects

Authors

  • Qinglong Shang,

    1. Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China
    2. Heilongjiang key Laboratory of Infection and Immunity, Heilongjiang Province, China
    3. Pathogenic-Biological key laboratory, Heilongjiang Higher Education Institutions, Harbin, China
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  • Haiping Wang,

    1. Department of Urology, the second affiliated hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China
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  • Yujia Song,

    1. School of Education Science, Harbin University, Harbin, China
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  • Lanlan Wei,

    1. Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China
    2. Heilongjiang key Laboratory of Infection and Immunity, Heilongjiang Province, China
    3. Pathogenic-Biological key laboratory, Heilongjiang Higher Education Institutions, Harbin, China
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  • Catharina Lavebratt,

    1. Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Fengmin Zhang,

    1. Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China
    2. Heilongjiang key Laboratory of Infection and Immunity, Heilongjiang Province, China
    3. Pathogenic-Biological key laboratory, Heilongjiang Higher Education Institutions, Harbin, China
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  • Hongxi Gu

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China
    2. Heilongjiang key Laboratory of Infection and Immunity, Heilongjiang Province, China
    3. Pathogenic-Biological key laboratory, Heilongjiang Higher Education Institutions, Harbin, China
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  • Qinglong Shang and Haiping Wang contributed equally to this work.

  • Funding agencies: This research was supported by the grant LC2009C26 from the Natural Science Foundation of Heilongjiang Province, grant 2011RFLXS025 from the Natural Science Foundation of Harbin city, and grant 81000726 from the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  • Author contributions: Hongxi Gu, Qinglong Shang and Fengmin Zhang conceived the idea and designed the study. Qinglong Shang, Haiping Wang, and Yujia Song collected data, conducted data analysis, and interpreted the results. Yujia Song calculated the data using software. Qinglong Shang, Lanlan Wei, and Catharina Lavebratt wrote the manuscript and revised the manuscript critically for important intellectual content. All authors had final approval of the submitted and published versions.

  • Disclosure: The authors declared no conflict of interest.

Abstract

Objective

Serological studies on the relationship between adenovirus 36 (Ad36) and an increased risk of obesity development have shown conflicting results. We reviewed the published studies and carried out a meta-analysis to explore this relationship.

Methods

PubMed was searched until December 2012 for the relative references with sufficient information to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 11 case-control studies, including 2508 obese subjects and 3005 controls, were selected.

Results

Compared with nonobese controls, Ad36 infection significantly increased the obesity risk by a pooled OR of 1.60 (95% CI = 1.14-2.25; P < 0.01). Meta-regression showed that the types of subject and obesity assessments were potential risk factors. In the subgroup analysis, a significantly increased risk was found in children (OR = 1.95; 95% CI = 1.34-2.85; z = 3.45; P < 0.01) and those with an obesity assessment of BMI ≥ 30 kg/cm2 (OR = 1.89; 95% CI = 1.15-3.10; P < 0.05).

Conclusions

Ad36 infection is associated with an increased risk of obesity development. To our knowledge, this is the first report to reveal the significant relationship in children with a serological data analysis.

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