The impact of maternal obesity and gestational weight gain on early and mid-pregnancy lipid profiles

Authors

  • Christina M. Scifres,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Magee Womens Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
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  • Janet M. Catov,

    1. Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Magee Womens Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
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  • Hyagriv N. Simhan

    1. Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Magee Womens Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
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  • Funding agency: This study was supported by NIH RO1 HD052732

  • Disclosure: The authors declared no conflict of interest.

  • Author contributions: All authors participated in the study design. CS and JC carried out the data analysis and interpretation, and all authors were involved in writing the paper and had final approval of the submitted and published versions.

Abstract

Objective

The impact of maternal overweight/obesity and excessive weight gain on maternal serum lipids in the first and second trimester of pregnancy was evaluated.

Methods

Prospective data were collected for 225 women. Maternal serum lipids and fatty acids were measured at <13 weeks and between 24 and 28 weeks. Analyses were stratified by normal weight versus overweight/obese status and excessive versus nonexcessive weight gain.

Results

Overweight/obese women had higher baseline cholesterol (161.3 ± 29.6 vs. 149.4 ± 26.8 mg/dl, P < 0.01), low-density lipoprotein LDL (80.0 ± 19.9 vs. 72.9 ± 18.8 mg/dl, P < 0.01), and triglycerides (81.7 ± 47.2 vs. 69.7 ± 40.3 mg/dl, P = 0.05) when compared to normal weight women, whereas high-density lipoprotein (43.6 ± 10.4 vs. 47.6 ± 11.5 mg/dl, P < 0.01) was lower. However, cholesterol and LDL increased at a higher weekly rate in normal weight women, resulting in higher total cholesterol in normal weight women (184.1 ± 28.1 vs. 176.0 ± 32.1 mg/dl, P = 0.05) at 24–28 weeks. The rate of change in lipid profiles in either group was not affected by excessive weight gain. Overweight/obese women had higher levels of arachidonic acid at both time points.

Conclusions

Overweight/obese women have significantly more atherogenic lipid profiles than normal weight women during the period of early pregnancy, delineating one physiologic pathway between that could explain differences in pregnancy outcomes normal weight and overweight/obese women.

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