Modifying influence of dietary sugar in the relationship between cortisol and visceral adipose tissue in minority youth

Authors


  • Funding agencies: This work was supported by the following: Grants: U54CA116848 from the National Cancer Institute, R01HD0033064 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 1P60MD002254-03 from the Office of Minority Health, 1K01DK078858 from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease, and USC Graduate Provost Fellowship.

  • Disclosure: The authors declared no conflict of interest.

Abstract

Objective

Cortisol has been associated with preferential visceral adipose tissue (VAT) deposition; however, findings in humans are mixed, which may be clarified when diet is considered.

Design and Methods

Participants included 165 African-American and Latino, overweight adolescents (BMI% 97.2±3.2%, ages 13-18, 67% Latino, 66% female). Body composition was determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, abdominal fat depots [VAT, subcutaneous (SAT)] by multiple-slice MRI, time-controlled serum sample to measure cortisol, and 2-day multi-pass 24-hour dietary recall. Linear regression analysis examined the cross-sectional relationship between cortisol, and the interaction of diet and cortisol on adiposity measures. Sex, race, age, and total body fat were a priori covariates.

Results

There was a significant interaction between cortisol and sugar (total and added) in the prediction of VAT (Pinteraction ≤ 0.05). Amongst participants with high total or added-sugar intake, cortisol was significantly associated with VAT (ß = 0.031 P < 0.001; ß = 0.026 P < 0.001), with no relationship in low consumers of total or added-sugar.

Conclusion

Dietary sugar may play an important role in modifying the relationship between cortisol and VAT, such that cortisol is significantly associated with elevated VAT under conditions of high sugar intake.

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