• Open Access

Fluorinated Boron-Dipyrromethene (BODIPY) Dyes: Bright and Versatile Probes for Surface Analysis

Authors

  • Mandy Hecht,

    1. Division 1.9 Sensor Materials, BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstätter-Str. 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany)
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  • Tobias Fischer,

    1. Division 1.9 Sensor Materials, BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstätter-Str. 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany)
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  • Dr. Paul Dietrich,

    1. Division 6.8 Surface Analysis and Interfacial Chemistry, BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 44–46, 12203 Berlin (Germany)
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  • Werner Kraus,

    1. Division 1.3 Structural Analysis, BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstätter-Str. 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany)
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  • Dr. Ana B. Descalzo,

    1. Division 1.9 Sensor Materials, BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstätter-Str. 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany)
    2. Current address: Department of Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Sciences, Complutense University of Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)
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  • Dr. Wolfgang E. S. Unger,

    1. Division 6.8 Surface Analysis and Interfacial Chemistry, BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 44–46, 12203 Berlin (Germany)
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  • Dr. Knut Rurack

    Corresponding author
    1. Division 1.9 Sensor Materials, BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstätter-Str. 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany)
    • Division 1.9 Sensor Materials, BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstätter-Str. 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany)
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Abstract

Invited for this month′s cover is the group of Dr. Knut Rurack. The cover picture shows a bright fluorescent dye (green halo) containing a high number of fluorine atoms (blue) for the assessment of reactive amino groups on a glass surface by two complementary surface analytical techniques. For more details, see the Full Paper on p. 25 ff.

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http://www.bam.de/en/index.htm

The Group of Knut Rurack

Read the full text of the article at 10.1002/open.201200039

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http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/open.v2.1/issuetoc

Is your current research mainly curiosity driven (fundamental) or rather applied?

Historically, the group is routed in the development of functional dyes for sensing and switching applications and was concerned with many fundamental aspects in the field such as the search for powerful signaling processes at the molecular level. Eventually, the focus broadened toward the integration of such responsive molecules and amplification processes with materials, exploiting novel synergisms of this combination and arriving at a point where we try to find fundamental approaches to applied problems. The present work is a good example of tailor-made functional dyes with specific properties allowing for (at least) dual-method detection.

What prompted you to investigate this topic/problem?

Whoever has tried to anchor functional entities covalently to a chemically activated surface knows that many different protocols exist in the literature for a particular combination of surface functional group and attachable molecule, and that the conjugation results for a certain commercial product can vary significantly from batch to batch. In utmost cases, the reason is that the number of (accessible) reactive groups per area unit differs. However, when one tries to assess the functionalization degree of such a support quantitatively, that is, the concentration of chemical groups across the entire support, one realizes that there are no reliable methods available today. Tackling this issue did not only prove to be highly relevant, but allowed us to use our fundamental research tools in an applied, metrological context.

What is the most significant result of this study?

That it works, that is, that you can take an amino slide, react it with our dye, scan the entire surface area with a fluorescence scanner for homogeneity and afterwards evaluate quantitatively exemplary areas of your choice of the identical slide by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to obtain the quantitative information.

In one word, how would you describe your research?

Rewarding!

Financial support from the Alexander-von-Humboldt Foundation (Germany), Adolf-Martens Fonds (Germany), Innovationsfonds (BAM/BMWi, Germany), European Commission’s Human Resources and Mobility Programme (Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowship) and the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP, project IND15 SurfChem) is highly appreciated. The EMRP is jointly funded by the EMRP participating countries within EURAMET and the EU. We thank Linda Lempke for synthetic support and Dieter Treu for assistance with the XPS measurements.

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