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ChemistryOpen

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December 2012

Volume 1, Issue 6

Pages 233–283

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      Cover Picture: (ChemistryOpen 6/2012) (page 233)

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/open.201290025

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      The cover picture shows the concept behind ChemistryOpen. By creating the first chemical society-owned open-access journal, ChemPubSoc Europe and Wiley-VCH have unlocked the door to all areas of chemistry, symbolized here by the periodic table. Work published in ChemistryOpen will be accessible to all, irrespective of socioeconomic or geographical considerations. With the backing of 16 continental European chemical societies and the experience of its sister journals to hand, ChemistryOpen is expected to continue the high standards and level of excellence to be expected from a ChemPubSoc Europe journal.

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      Masthead: ChemistryOpen 6/2012 (page 234)

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/open.201290026

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      Graphical Abstract: ChemistryOpen 6/2012 (pages 235–237)

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/open.201290027

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      Masthead: ChemistryOpen 6/2012 (page 239)

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/open.201290028

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      Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemistryOpen 6/2012 (pages 240–243)

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/open.201290029

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
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      Facile Oxidative Rearrangements Using Hypervalent Iodine Reagents (pages 245–250)

      Dr. Fateh V. Singh, Dr. Julia Rehbein and Prof. Dr. Thomas Wirth

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/open.201200037

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      Rearranged by iodine: Aromatic substituents migrate in a novel oxidative cyclization. Calculations highlight the cationic nature of the intermediates in the rearrangement. The fast access to heavily substituted furanones is used for the synthesis of biologically active derivatives.

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      Antibody-Capped Mesoporous Nanoscopic Materials: Design of a Probe for the Selective Chromo-Fluorogenic Detection of Finasteride (pages 251–259)

      Dr. Estela Climent, Prof. Ramón Martínez-Máñez, Prof. Ángel Maquieira, Dr. Félix Sancenón, Dr. M. Dolores Marcos, Dr. Eva M. Brun, Dr. Juan Soto and Prof. Pedro Amorós

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/open.201100008

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      Antibodies as gatekeepers: Novel capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) using antibodies as gatekeepers have been prepared in order to detect finasteride. In the presence of these particles (S1-AB), displacement of the antibody takes place, uncapping the pores and releasing the entrapped dye (see figure). Detection of finasteride in biological samples was tested using blank urine as standard matrix.

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      Does Electron Capture Dissociation Cleave Protein Disulfide Bonds? (pages 260–268)

      Barbara Ganisl and Dr. Kathrin Breuker

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/open.201200038

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      Runner-up! Disulfide bond cleavage comes second in gas phase radical ion chemistry. Cleavage of N[BOND]Cα backbone bonds is preferred over disulfide bond cleavage in electron capture dissociation (ECD) of peptides and proteins, but disulfide bonds can be cleaved by vibrational excitation or secondary radical reactions.

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      Molecular Recognition in Glycolaldehyde, the Simplest Sugar: Two Isolated Hydrogen Bonds Win Over One Cooperative Pair (pages 269–275)

      Jonas Altnöder, Dr. Juhyon J. Lee, Katharina E. Otto and Prof. Dr. Martin A. Suhm

      Article first published online: 12 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/open.201200031

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      Two-way communication: Cell communication often involves carbohydrate recognition. The simplest carbohydrate molecule already offers many ways to interact with a second one. Supersonic jet spectroscopy reveals the favorite communication channel based on equivalent hydrogen bonds, but on the corrugated potential energy landscape of glycolaldehyde dimer, the molecules may also get trapped in a metastable one-way communication mode, which is stabilized in hydroxyacetone.

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      Stimulation of Ideas through Compound-Based Bibliometrics: Counting and Mapping Chemical Compounds for Analyzing Research Topics in Chemistry, Physics, and Materials Science (pages 276–283)

      Dr. Andreas Barth and Dr. Werner Marx

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/open.201200029

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      Hot topics and white patches! Counting compounds rather than publications or citations opens a new perspective to quantitative analysis of research activities. Compound classes can be mapped in order to visualize both the existing and the not yet synthesized compound species. As applications of our method, we have chosen three examples from inorganic chemistry: rare earth compounds, rare earth cuprates and quasicrystals.

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