Intersectoral differences in public affairs: the duty of public reporting in public administration

Authors

  • Mordecai Lee

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Governmental Affairs, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Suite 6000, 161 West Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53203-2602, USA
    • Department of Governmental Affairs, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Suite 6000, 161 West Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53203-2602, USA
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    • Mordecai Leeis Assistant Professor, Department of Governmental Affairs, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He is a former elected official and NGO executive director, with many published papers to his name. For more information, see:http://www.uwm.edu/∼mordecai/.


Abstract

Public reporting is a requirement for public affairs practitioners in public administration because of the democratic context in which government operates. By reporting to the public-at-large on agency activities, government agencies contributed to an informed citizenry, the essential foundation of a democracy. For public affairs in business administration and non-profit administration, public reporting is desirable rather than mandatory. Public reporting was traditionally accomplished indirectly, through news media coverage of government. However, recent research suggests a diminution of interest by the media in fulfilling its role as an instrument of democracy. This means that the public reporting obligation of public affairs professionals in public administration needs to shift to direct reporting, through such products as annual reports, newsletters, TV programmes, Internet websites etc. Copyright © 2002 Henry Stewart Publications.

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