Uganda's decentralised primary education: musical chairs and inverted elite capture in School Management Committees

Authors

  • Gerard Prinsen,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of People, Environment and Planning, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand
    • School of People, Environment and Planning, Massey University, Private Bag 11222, Palmerston North, New Zealand.
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  • Kristof Titeca

    Corresponding author
    1. Conflict Research Group/Centre for Third World Studies, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
    • Conflict Research Group/Centre for Third World Studies, Ghent University, Universiteitsstraat 8, 9000 Ghent, Belgium.
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Abstract

Decentralisation policies in Africa increasingly place responsibilities and resources for the provision of public services in the hands of public bodies at the lowest level, for example in School Management Committees (SMCs). This paper questions whether elite capture, which is considered a major reason for the ineffectiveness of the management of public services at a national level, also characterises SMCs. On the basis of field research in Uganda, it is argued that elite capture does not trickle down to the lowest levels in the management of public services. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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