Paleoceanography

Cover image for Vol. 28 Issue 2

June 2013

Volume 28, Issue 2

Pages 213–376

  1. Regular Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Regular Articles
    1. Millennial-scale variability to 735 ka: High-resolution climate records from Santa Barbara Basin, CA (pages 213–226)

      Sarah M. White, Tessa M. Hill, James P. Kennett, Richard J. Behl and Craig Nicholson

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/palo.20022

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      Key Points

      • Discrete intervals in Santa Barbara Basin cores show D/O-like shifts to 735 ka
      • Cores have ~10-50 year resolution
      • Millennial-scale climate shifts in all cores are similar to those during MIS 3
    2. Movement of deep-sea coral populations on climatic timescales (pages 227–236)

      Nivedita Thiagarajan, Dana Gerlach, Mark L. Roberts, Andrea Burke, Ann McNichol, William J. Jenkins, Adam V. Subhas, Ronald E. Thresher and Jess F. Adkins

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/palo.20023

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      Key Points

      • 400+ deep-sea corals were 14C-dated using Reconnaissance Dating Method
      • Coral populations respond to major climatic events, including LGM, YD and HS1
      • Coral populations affected by changes in productivity, oxygen and [CO32-]
    3. Calibration and application of B/Ca, Cd/Ca, and δ11B in Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sinistral) to constrain CO2 uptake in the subpolar North Atlantic during the last deglaciation (pages 237–252)

      Jimin Yu, David J. R. Thornalley, James W. B. Rae and Nick I. McCave

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/palo.20024

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      Key Points

      • Subsurface pCO2 and nutrient from B/Ca, Cd/Ca and d11B in N. pachyderma (s)
      • B/Ca and d11B suggest a CO2 sink off Iceland at 19-10 ka
      • Nutrient utilization correlates with millennial-scale pCO2 variations
    4. Abrupt changes in deep Atlantic circulation during the transition to full glacial conditions (pages 253–262)

      David J. R. Thornalley, Stephen Barker, Julia Becker, Ian R. Hall and Gregor Knorr

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/palo.20025

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      Key Points

      • The Western Boundary Undercurrent is examined across the MIS 5a/4 transition
      • Changes in flow speed structure are linked to abrupt climate change events
      • Full glacial conditions are associated with a shallower mode of circulation
    5. Erosion and reworking of Pacific sediments near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary (pages 263–273)

      Ted C. Moore Jr.

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/palo.20027

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      Key Points

      • Reworking of Eocene radiolarians occurred as pulses through the late Eocene
      • Largest reworking pulses at in the E/O boundary interval
      • Physical erosion and redeposition likely caused by internal wave turbulence
    6. Late Pliocene to early Pleistocene changes in the North Atlantic Current and suborbital-scale sea-surface temperature variability (pages 274–282)

      Oliver Friedrich, Paul A. Wilson, Clara T. Bolton, Christopher J. Beer and Ralf Schiebel

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/palo.20029

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      Key Points

      • High SSTs argue against a significant weakening or southward movement of the NAC
      • SSTs show small-amplitude variability independent of glacial/interglacial state
      • iNHG involve amplifying feedback mechanisms tightly coupled to ice-sheet growth
    7. Atlantic Water advection versus sea-ice advances in the eastern Fram Strait during the last 9 ka: Multiproxy evidence for a two-phase Holocene (pages 283–295)

      Kirstin Werner, Robert F. Spielhagen, Dorothea Bauch, H. Christian Hass and Evgeniya Kandiano

      Article first published online: 31 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/palo.20028

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      Key Points

      • Stepwise transition of Holocene to modern situationin eastern Fram Strait
      • Strong heat flux 9-5 ka, coolings at 8.2., 6.9, 6.1, and 5.2 ka
      • Neoglacial parallel to flooding of Arctic shelves/modern sea-ice production
    8. Isotopically depleted carbon in the mid-depth South Atlantic during the last deglaciation (pages 296–306)

      A. C. Tessin and D. C. Lund

      Article first published online: 20 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/palo.20026

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      Key Points

      • Mid-depth SW Atlantic had negative d13C anomalies during the last deglaciation
      • Benthic d13C anomalies are larger than the atmospheric d13C signal
      • Isotopic results cannot be easily explained with conservative mixing
    9. Evidence of silicic acid leakage to the tropical Atlantic via Antarctic Intermediate Water during Marine Isotope Stage 4 (pages 307–318)

      James D. Griffiths, Stephen Barker, Katharine R. Hendry, David J. R. Thornalley, Tina van de Flierdt, Ian R. Hall and Robert F. Anderson

      Article first published online: 27 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/palo.20030

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      Key Points

      • Silicic acid leaks from the Southern Ocean to low latitudes
      • This silicic acid may enhance diatom growth in the low latitude surface ocean
      • The enhancement of diatom growth may contribute to glacial pCO2 drawdown
    10. High-resolution migration history of the Subtropical High/Trade Wind system of the northeastern Pacific during the last ~55 years: Implications for glacial atmospheric reorganization (pages 319–333)

      Heather Cheshire and Juergen Thurow

      Article first published online: 27 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/palo.20031

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      Key Points

      • Subtropical High/Trade Wind system is key player in global climate change
      • Evidence of millennial-scale aridity and stratification in Guaymas Basin
      • Evidence of correlation between Guaymas Basin and Greenland ice core record
    11. Paleoproductivity during the middle Miocene carbon isotope events: A data-model approach (pages 334–346)

      Liselotte Diester-Haass, Katharina Billups, Ingrid Jacquemin, Kay C. Emeis, Vincent Lefebvre and Louis François

      Article first published online: 27 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/palo.20033

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      Key Points

      • Mid Miocene productivity and d13C changes during CM events
      • Productivity variations linked toclimate induced changes in ocean circulation
      • Model result: 13C maxima occur ~70-80 kyr after sea level high stands
    12. Southwest Pacific Ocean response to a warming world: Using Mg/Ca, Zn/Ca, and Mn/Ca in foraminifera to track surface ocean water masses during the last deglaciation (pages 347–362)

      Julene P. Marr, Lionel Carter, Helen C. Bostock, Annette Bolton and Euan Smith

      Article first published online: 28 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/palo.20032

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      Key Points

      • Zn/Ca can be used to trace surface water masses
      • Mg/Ca, Zn/Ca trace surface water thermal and nutrient stratification
      • SW Pacific Ocean surface ocean deglacial changes are wind driven
    13. Planktonic foraminiferal area density as a proxy for carbonate ion concentration: A calibration study using the Cariaco Basin ocean time series (pages 363–376)

      Brittney J. Marshall, Robert C. Thunell, Michael J. Henehan, Yrene Astor and Katherine E. Wejnert

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/palo.20034

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      Key Points

      • Foraminiferal area density & [CO32-] have a strong positive linear relationship
      • Temperature & [PO43-] do not significantly impact foraminiferal area density
      • Foraminiferal area density could serve as a as reliable proxy for past [CO32-]

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