A low dielectric constant polyimide/polyoxometalate composite

Authors

  • Lin Tan,

    1. College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, P.R. China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Shumei Liu,

    1. College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, P.R. China
    2. The Key Lab of GD for High Property and Functional Macromolecular Materials, Guangzhou 510640, P.R. China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Fang Zeng,

    1. College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, P.R. China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Shukun Zhang,

    1. China Electronic Product Reliability and Environmental Testing Research Institute, Guangzhou 510640, P.R. China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jianqing Zhao,

    Corresponding author
    1. College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, P.R. China
    • College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, P.R. China.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Yin-e Yu

    1. China Electronic Product Reliability and Environmental Testing Research Institute, Guangzhou 510640, P.R. China
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

A silane-modified mono-lacunary Keggin-type polyoxometalate (POM), (Bu4N)4[SiW11O39{(CH2[DOUBLE BOND]CH[BOND]Si)2O}] (SiW11[BOND]CH[DOUBLE BOND]CH2), was obtained by reaction of vinyltrimethoxysilane with K8(SiW11O39) in acidic MeCN/H2O mixed solutions. Then, the modified polyoxometalate was physically blended with the pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA)-4,4′-oxydianiline (ODA) poly(amic acid) and the blends were thermally imidized to form polyimide/ polyoxometalate composites. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicates that the polyoxometalate clusters cannot form crystalline structures in the composite, suggesting that the blending leads to improved compatibility between the polymer matrix and the modified polyoxometalate. The EDS (W-mapping) studies on the composite films reveal that the polyoxometalate clusters are well dispersed in the polyimide matrix. The physical incorporation of modified POM into polyimide remarkably reduced the dielectric constant of the latter from 3.29 to 2.05 when 20 wt% of SiW11[BOND]CH[DOUBLE BOND]CH2 was used. Besides, the addition of the modified POM into polyimide increased the storage modulus of polyimide without severely affecting its thermal properties. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Ancillary