Late sporadic miscarriage is associated with abnormalities in spiral artery transformation and trophoblast invasion

Authors

  • E Ball,

    1. School of Surgical and Reproductive Sciences (Obstetrics and Gynaecology), University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
    2. School of Clinical and Laboratory Sciences (Pathology), University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
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  • JN Bulmer,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Clinical and Laboratory Sciences (Pathology), University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
    • School of Surgical and Reproductive Sciences, 3rd Floor, William Leech Building, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK.
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  • S Ayis,

    1. Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
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  • F Lyall,

    1. Maternal and Fetal Medicine Section, Institute of Medical Genetics, Yorkhill, Glasgow, UK
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  • SC Robson

    1. School of Surgical and Reproductive Sciences (Obstetrics and Gynaecology), University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
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Abstract

Trophoblast invasion of uterine decidua and myometrium, and spiral artery transformation, are essential for the development of normal pregnancy; this process is impaired in pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction, and pre-term labour. The hypothesis that late miscarriage is associated with reduced trophoblast invasion and spiral artery transformation was tested in a large series of placental bed biopsies containing decidua and myometrium from late, karyotyped, embryonic miscarriage (≥13 weeks' gestation; n = 26; n = 96 spiral arteries) and gestationally matched ultrasound-dated normal pregnancies (n = 74; n = 236 spiral arteries). Cryostat sections were immunostained using an avidin–biotin peroxidase technique for cytokeratin, desmin, and von Willebrand factor to detect trophoblast, myometrium, and vascular smooth muscle and endothelium, respectively. Trophoblast invasion and individual features of spiral artery transformation were assessed and analysed using a logistic regression model. Compared with normal pregnancy, myometrial spiral arteries in late miscarriage showed reduced endovascular (4% vs. 31%, p = 0.001) and intramural trophoblast (76% vs. 88%, p = 0.05), and less extensive fibrinoid change (4% vs. 18%, p = 0.01). In contrast, endovascular trophoblast in decidual spiral arteries was increased (40% vs. 66%, p = 0.04). These findings suggest that, in common with pre-eclampsia, late sporadic miscarriage may be associated with reduced trophoblast invasion and inadequate transformation of myometrial spiral arteries. Copyright © 2006 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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