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Positive association between congenital anomalies and risk of neuroblastoma

Authors

  • Florence Menegaux MD,

    1. Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    2. Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, U170-IFR69 Villejuif, France
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  • Andrew F. Olshan PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    • Children's Oncology Group, P.O. Box 60012, Arcadia, CA 91066-6012.
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  • Pamela J. Reitnauer MD, PhD, MPH,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    2. Pediatric Teaching Program, Medical Genetics, Moses Cone Health System, Greensboro, North Carolina
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  • Julie Blatt MD,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
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  • Susan L. Cohn MD

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois
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Abstract

Background

Case reports and epidemiological studies have suggested a relationship between congenital anomalies and childhood cancer, but some potential associations remain inconsistent. In this study, we investigated the association between congenital anomalies and neuroblastoma.

Procedure

We used data of a case-control study on neuroblastoma conducted from 1992 to 1994, including 538 children aged 0–19 years with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed neuroblastoma and 504 controls identified by telephone random-digit dialing and matched to cases on date of birth. Information on congenital anomalies and potential confounding factors was collected through maternal telephone interviews using a structured questionnaire. We estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for reference age at diagnosis, mother's educational level, mother's race, and household income at birth.

Results

An association between the maternal report of any congenital anomalies and neuroblastoma (OR = 2.58; CI = 1.57–4.25) was observed. Neuroblastoma risk increased with increasing number of anomalies per child (OR = 3.90, CI = 1.27–11.9 for two anomalies or more), and when we restricted analyses to major anomalies (OR = 7.53, CI = 2.23–25.5). Genitourinary anomalies (OR = 5.84, CI = 1.67–20.4) and cardiac anomalies (OR = 4.27, CI = 1.22–15.0) had an elevated, but imprecise neuroblastoma risk.

Conclusions

Our findings support the hypothesis of an association between neuroblastoma and congenital, especially urogenital and cardiac, anomalies. © 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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