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Prevalence of advanced bone age in a cohort of patients who received cis-retinoic acid for high-risk neuroblastoma

Authors

  • Wendy L. Hobbie MSN, CRNP, FAAN,

    1. Division of Oncology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    2. University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Sogol Mostoufi- Moab MD,

    1. Division of Oncology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    2. Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    3. Division of Endocrinology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Claire A. Carlson BSN, RN,

    1. Division of Oncology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Denise Gruccio MSN, CRNP,

    1. Division of Endocrinology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Jill P. Ginsberg MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Oncology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    2. Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    • Center for Childhood Cancer Research, Division of Oncology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Colket Translational Research Building, 3501 Civic Center Blvd, 10th Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Erratum: Prevalence of advanced bone age in a cohort of patients who received cis-retinoic acid for high-risk neuroblastoma Volume 60, Issue 7, 1244, Article first published online: 19 December 2012

  • Conflict of interest: Nothing to declare.

Abstract

In the last decade, 13-cis-retinoic acid (13-cis-RA) has been added to the treatment of patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. In survivors of neuroblastoma, short stature is consistently observed. Causes include growth hormone deficiency and poor growth of irradiated long bones. Within the survivorship program at CHOP, we have observed that a number of these patients also have advanced bone ages. Children treated with 13-cis-RA are at risk for advanced bone age that may dramatically impact their linear growth. Ongoing evaluation is necessary to examine the effect of 13-cis-RA on final adult height and to inform clinical practice in this cohort. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2011;56:474–476. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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