Sleep, fatigue, depression, and quality of life in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Authors

  • Maartje S. Gordijn MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pediatrics, Division Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Pediatrics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    • Department of Pediatrics, Division of Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, PO Box 7057, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
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  • Raphaële R. van Litsenburg MD,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Division Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Pediatrics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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  • Reinoud J. Gemke MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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  • Jaap Huisman PhD,

    1. Department of Medical Psychology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Pediatric Psychology & Social Work, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • Marc B. Bierings MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Pediatric Hemato/Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • Peter M. Hoogerbrugge MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Pediatric Hemato-Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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  • Gertjan J.L. Kaspers MD, PhD

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Division Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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  • Conflict of interest: Nothing to declare.

Abstract

Background

With the improved survival of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the effect of treatment on psychosocial well-being becomes increasingly relevant. Literature on sleep and fatigue during treatment is emerging. However, information on these subjects after treatment is sparse. This cross-sectional study examined sleep and fatigue in relation to depression and quality of life (QoL) after treatment for childhood ALL.

Procedure

Sleep, fatigue, depression, and QoL were evaluated by parent proxy and/or child self-reports of the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire, the PedsQL™ multidimensional fatigue scale, the Children's Depression Inventory and the Child Health Questionnaire. All total scores were compared to Dutch norm references.

Results

Sixty-two children were included, being 36 (interquartile range 22–62) months after finishing treatment. Parents rated the ALL survivors as having more disturbed sleep, more fatigue and poorer physical QoL compared to the Dutch norm. ALL survivors themselves reported less sleep problems, less depressive symptoms, and better psychosocial QoL than the Dutch norm. More sleep disturbances and fatigue correlated with more symptoms of depression and a worse QoL.

Conclusions

Differences in parental and self-reports, including worse parental ratings, might be explained by worried parents and/or the adaptive style of the children. Impaired sleep and fatigue correlated with more depressive symptoms and a worse QoL. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2013; 60: 479–485. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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