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Essential medicines for pediatric oncology in developing countries

Authors

  • Parth S. Mehta MD, MPH,

    Corresponding author
    1. Section of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
    2. Section of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Gabarone, Botswana
    • Texas Children's Cancer & Hematology Centers, West Campus, 18200 Katy Fwy, 4th Floor, Houston, TX 77094.
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  • John T. Wiernikowski PharmD,

    1. McMaster Children's Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
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  • J A. Sergio Petrilli MD, PhD,

    1. Pediatric Oncology Institute, School of Medicine, Federal University of Sao Paolo, Sao Paolo, Brazil
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  • Ronald D. Barr MB ChB, MD,

    1. McMaster Children's Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    2. Departments of Pediatrics, Pathology and Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
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  • for the Working Group on Essential Medicines of the Pediatric Oncology in Developing Countries committee of SIOP


  • Dr. Wiernikowski is the current President of the International Society of Oncology Pharmacy Practitioners.

Abstract

The burden of cancer in children in low and middle income countries (LMICs) is substantial, comprising at least 80% of incident cases globally, and an even higher proportion of cancer-related deaths. With survival rates exceeding 80% in high income countries, it is imperative to transfer these successes to LMICs. A major challenge is the poor availability of safe, cost-effective chemotherapy. A list of 51 drugs—chemotherapeutics, infectious disease agents, and supportive care medications—is proposed as essential to improving the survival of children with cancer in LMICs with an additional 13 drugs identified as being of further value. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2013; 60: 889–891. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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