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Predictors of future health-related quality of life in survivors of adolescent cancer

Authors

  • Vikki G. Nolan DSc,

    Corresponding author
    1. From the Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Memphis, School of Public Health, Memphis, Tennessee
    • Correspondence to: Vikki G. Nolan, University of Memphis, School of Public Health, Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 3825 Desoto Ave. Robison Hall, Room 309, Memphis, TN.

      E-mail: vgnolan@memphis.edu

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  • Kevin R. Krull PhD,

    1. Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee
    2. Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee
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  • James G. Gurney PhD,

    1. From the Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Memphis, School of Public Health, Memphis, Tennessee
    2. Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee
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  • Wendy Leisenring ScD,

    1. Department of Clinical Statistics and Cancer Prevention, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington
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  • Leslie L. Robison PhD,

    1. Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee
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  • Kirsten K. Ness PT, PhD

    1. Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee
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  • Conflict of Interest: Nothing to report.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify characteristics associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among long-term survivors of adolescent cancer enrolled in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Thirty percent of survivors reported poor physical and/or mental HRQOL. Race/ethnicity, education, and head/neck disfigurement were significantly associated with poor mental HRQOL, while sex, age, household income, obesity, alkylating agents, pelvic radiation, head/neck or limb disfigurement, and walking with a limp were associated with poor physical HRQOL. Identification of high-risk adolescent cancer patients may facilitate timely intervention to attempt to minimize the impact of cancer and treatment on subsequent quality of life. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2014; 61:1891–1894. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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