Purification of Phenylalkanoids and Monoterpene Glycosides from Rhodiola rosea L. Roots by High-speed Counter-current Chromatography

Authors

  • Elizabeth Mudge,

    1. Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    2. British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada
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  • Daise Lopes-Lutz,

    1. Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
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  • Paula N. Brown,

    1. British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada
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  • Andreas Schieber

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    • Institute of Nutritional and Food Sciences, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
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Correspondence to: A. Schieber, Institute of Nutritional and Food Sciences, University of Bonn, Römerstrasse 164, D-53117 Bonn, Germany. E-mail: Schieber@uni-bonn.de

ABSTRACT

Introduction

Rhodiola rosea L. is a medicinal herb used for its adaptogenic properties. The main active components are the phenylpropanoids collectively referred to as rosavins.

Objectives

To develop an isolation method for phytochemicals present in Rhodiola rosea roots using high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC).

Methodology

The roots of Rhodiola rosea were extracted with methanol and fractionated using liquid–liquid partition and polyamide column clean-up. The purified fraction (100 mg) was subjected to semi-preparative HSCCC using the two-phase solvent system ethyl acetate:butanol:water (3:2:5). The head-to-tail elution mode was employed with a flow rate of 1.5 mL/min and a rotary speed of 1000 rpm.

Results

The separation yielded six main fractions with four components more than 90% pure. The sixth fraction was further purified using semi-preparative HPLC with a Synergi-hydro RP C18-column to obtain rosin and geranyl 1-O-α-l-arabinopyranosyl(1 → 6)-β-d-glucopyranoside. The main components isolated were rosavin (3.4 mg, 97% purity), salidroside (0.5 mg, 90% purity), benzyl-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (1.2 mg, 85% purity), rosarin (1.3 mg, 99% purity), rosiridin (1.8 mg, 92% purity), rosin (1.2 mg, 95% purity) and geranyl 1-O-α-l-arabinopyranosyl(1 → 6)-β-d-glucopyranoside (6.5 mg, 97% purity). The identity and purity of these components were confirmed using ultrafast liquid chromatography–diode-array detector–MS/MS analysis, 1 H- and 13 C-NMR spectroscopy.

Conclusion

High-speed counter-current chromatography was successful in the isolation of several phytochemicals present in Rhodiola rosea roots, including two components that are not commercially available. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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