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Developing a Chinese PTSD Inventory (CPI) based on interviews with earthquake victims in Sichuan

Authors

  • Zhengkui Liu,

    1. Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
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  • Yin Liu,

    1. Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
    2. Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
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  • Yuqing Zhang,

    Corresponding author
    1. Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
    • Correspondence: Dr. Yuqing Zhang, Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 16 Lincui Road, Beijing 100101, China. Email: zhangyq@psych.ac.cn

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  • Zhengen Chen,

    1. Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
    2. Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
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  • Walter J. Hannak

    1. Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
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Abstract

Although some of the self-report scales for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are available in Chinese and are currently in use in China, cultural limitations exist. An indigenous Chinese PTSD self-rating scale—the Chinese PTSD Inventory (CPI)—has been developed. The item generation of the CPI was based on interviews of Sichuan earthquake victims. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted on a sample of 313 earthquake victims, acquiring five factors with 27 items: Intrusion, Avoidance, Hyperarousal, Dysphoria, and Somatization. Another sample of 227 debris-flow victims was administered the 27-item CPI. It demonstrated high internal consistency and test-retest reliability, and the result of confirmatory factor analysis indicated a good fit for the five-factor model.

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