The fetal cerebellum. Pitfalls in diagnosis and management

Authors

  • Gustavo Malinger,

    Corresponding author
    1. Fetal Neurology Clinic, Prenatal Diagnosis Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Genetics Institute and Pediatric Neurology Unit, The Edith Wolfson Medical Center, Holon and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
    • Prenatal Diagnosis Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Edith Wolfson Medical Center, Holon 58100, Israel.
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  • Dorit Lev,

    1. Fetal Neurology Clinic, Prenatal Diagnosis Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Genetics Institute and Pediatric Neurology Unit, The Edith Wolfson Medical Center, Holon and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
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  • Tally Lerman-Sagie

    1. Fetal Neurology Clinic, Prenatal Diagnosis Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Genetics Institute and Pediatric Neurology Unit, The Edith Wolfson Medical Center, Holon and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
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Abstract

Prenatal diagnosis of congenital and acquired cerebellar disorders is possible by the use of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although numerous studies have been conducted in this field, diagnostic uncertainties are still common in daily clinical practice. This review outlines five possible pitfalls in the diagnosis of fetal cerebellar disorders: confusion between different entities describing vermian pathologies (Dandy–Walker variant, vermian hypoplasia and vermian agenesis); premature diagnosis of abnormal vermian formation; difficulties in the ultrasonographic differentiation between the cerebellar hemispheres and the vermis; late development of cerebellar hypoplasia/atrophy and differential diagnosis of unilateral cerebellar findings. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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