Demographic differences in Down syndrome livebirths in the US from 1989 to 2006

Authors

  • James F. X. Egan,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT, USA
    • Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Connecticut Health Center, 263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT 06030, USA.
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  • Kathleen Smith,

    1. Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT, USA
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  • Diane Timms,

    1. Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT, USA
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  • Jay M. Bolnick,

    1. Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT, USA
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  • Winston A. Campbell,

    1. Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT, USA
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  • Peter A. Benn

    1. Genetics and Developmental Biology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT, USA
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Abstract

Objective

To explore demographic differences in Down syndrome livebirths in the United States.

Methods

Using National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) birth certificate data from 1989 to 2006 we analyzed Down syndrome livebirths after correcting for under-reporting. We created six subsets based on maternal age (15–34 and 35–49 years old); US regions, that is, Northeast, Midwest, South and West; marital status, (married, unmarried); education, ( ≤ 12 years, ≥ 13 years); race, (white, black); and Hispanic ethnicity, (non-Hispanic, Hispanic). We estimated expected Down syndrome livebirths assuming no change in birth certificate reporting. The percentage of expected Down syndrome livebirths actually born was calculated by year.

Results

There were 72 613 424 livebirths from 1989 to 2006. There were 122 519 Down syndrome livebirths expected and 65 492 were actually born. The Midwest had the most expected Down syndrome livebirths actually born (67.6%); the West was lowest (44.4%). More expected Down syndrome livebirths were born to women who were 15 to 34 years old (61 vs 43.8%) and to those with ≤ 12 years education (60.4 vs 46.9%), white race (56.6 vs 37%), unmarried (56.0 vs 52.5%), and of Hispanic ethnicity (55.0 vs 53.3%).

Conclusion

The percentage of expected Down syndrome livebirths actually born varies by demographics. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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