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Dose-response and time-response analysis of total fatty acid ethyl esters in meconium as a biomarker of prenatal alcohol exposure

Authors

  • Ho-Seok Kwak,

    1. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Cheil General Hospital and Women's Healthcare Center, Kwandong University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Jung-Yeol Han,

    Corresponding author
    1. The Korean Motherisk Program, Cheil General Hospital and Women's Healthcare Centre, Kwandong University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
    2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Cheil General Hospital and Women's Healthcare Centre, Kwandong University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • June-Seek Choi,

    1. The Korean Motherisk Program, Cheil General Hospital and Women's Healthcare Centre, Kwandong University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
    2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Cheil General Hospital and Women's Healthcare Centre, Kwandong University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Hyun-Kyong Ahn,

    1. The Korean Motherisk Program, Cheil General Hospital and Women's Healthcare Centre, Kwandong University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
    2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Cheil General Hospital and Women's Healthcare Centre, Kwandong University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Dong-Wook Kwak,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Cheil General Hospital and Women's Healthcare Centre, Kwandong University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Yeon-Kyung Lee,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Cheil General Hospital and Women's Healthcare Centre, Kwandong University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Sun-Young Koh,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Cheil General Hospital and Women's Healthcare Centre, Kwandong University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Go-Un Jeong,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Cheil General Hospital and Women's Healthcare Centre, Kwandong University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • E. Yadira Velázquez-Armenta,

    1. PharmaReasons – Pharmacological Research and Applied Solutions, Toronto, Canada
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  • Alejandro A. Nava-Ocampo

    1. PharmaReasons – Pharmacological Research and Applied Solutions, Toronto, Canada
    2. Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
    3. Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada
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  • Funding sources: The study was supported by the Korean Food and Drug Administration under grant no. 13182KFDA766.

  • Conflicts of interest: None declared.

ABSTRACT

Objectives

Little is known on how the dose and timing of exposure co-influence the cumulative concentration of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in meconium. The objective of the study was to assess the cumulative concentration of FAEEs in meconium as a biomarker of light, moderate, or heavy prenatal alcohol exposure occurring at either first, second, or third trimesters of pregnancy.

Methods

History of prenatal alcohol exposure was obtained in the 34th week of gestation from 294 pregnant women. Meconium was collected from their babies within the first 6 to 12 h after birth and examined for the presence of nine FAEEs.

Results

No significant differences were identified between the cumulative levels of FAEEs in the meconium from the babies born to abstainers and those born to mothers with history of light-to-moderate prenatal alcohol exposure during their pregnancy.

Conclusions

Light-to-moderate prenatal alcohol exposure cannot be reliably predicted by the cumulative FAEE concentrations in meconium of exposed babies. A cumulative FAEE level of >10 nmol/g would be required to consider that prenatal alcohol exposure during the second to third trimesters occurred at risky levels in the absence of reliable maternal history of ethanol exposure. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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