Calcium supplementation, cardiovascular disease and mortality in older women

Authors

  • Sunil M. Shah BSc, MBBS, MSc, FFPH,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Community Health Sciences, St George's University of London, London, UK
    • Division of Community Health Sciences, St George's University of London, Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 0RE, UK.
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    • Senior Lecturer.

  • Iain M. Carey BSc, MSc, PhD,

    1. Division of Community Health Sciences, St George's University of London, London, UK
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    • Research Fellow.

  • Tess Harris BSc, MBBS, MSc, MRCGP, MD,

    1. Division of Community Health Sciences, St George's University of London, London, UK
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    • Senior Lecturer.

  • Stephen DeWilde MBBS, DRCOG, MRCGP, MD,

    1. Division of Community Health Sciences, St George's University of London, London, UK
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    • Clinical Research Fellow.

  • Derek G. Cook BSc, MSc, PhD, FFPH

    1. Division of Community Health Sciences, St George's University of London, London, UK
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    • Professor of Epidemiology.


  • All authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the long-term cumulative effect of calcium and vitamin D supplementation on cardiovascular outcomes and death in older women.

Methods

We undertook an observational cohort study using UK electronic primary care records in the Doctor's Independent Network (DIN-LINK) database; 9910 women aged 60–89 who started calcium and vitamin D supplementation between 2000 and 2005, with no heart disease or stroke history and who survived disease free for 2 years after supplement initiation were studied. The main outcome was first occurrence of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke or death more than 2 years after initiation.

Results

In the period from 2 years after supplement initiation, women who had received >600 days supplementation in these first 2 years were no more at risk of MI, stroke or death (hazard ratio 0.82 (0.67–1.01)) compared to women who received ≤90 days supplementation in the first 2 years. Outcomes in the first 2 years were analysed separately and showed similar baseline risks in our comparison groups.

Conclusion

Two years after initiation, women who have consistently received supplementation with calcium and vitamin D do not experience more cardiovascular events or deaths than women who received minimal supplementation. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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