Rheological study on high-density polyethylene/organoclay composites

Authors

  • Youhong Tang,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
    Current affiliation:
    1. Centre for Advanced Marine Materials, School of Civil Engineering and Transportation, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641, China.
    • Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
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  • Cheng Yang,

    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
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  • Ping Gao,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
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  • Lin Ye,

    1. Centre for Advanced Materials Technology, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
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  • Chengbi Zhao,

    1. Centre for Advanced Marine Materials, School of Civil Engineering and Transportation, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641, China
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  • Wei Lin

    1. Centre for Advanced Marine Materials, School of Civil Engineering and Transportation, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641, China
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Abstract

Maleic anhydride-grafted polyethylene (MAPE) is investigated as a compatibilizer of polyethylene/organoclay nanocomposite. With MAPE help, partial exfoliation of the organoclay occurs in the nanocomposites with the melt compounding method for organoclay loading up to 8.0 wt%. Investigation of the rheological behaviors shows that at high frequencies or shear rates, the viscosity is essentially unaffected by the presence of organoclay; however, at low frequencies or shear rates, viscoelastic behavior alters dramatically, and this is attributed to the presence of anisotropic stacks of randomly oriented organoclay sheets and the formation of network structures. The important observations are firstly the initial stress overshooting observed in steady shear. At low shear rates, stress is much greater at the initial stage than the stress at the steady state; however, it can be eliminated by preshear at low shear rates, which means that preshearing can effectively break down the network structures and align the organoclay. Second, the normalized stress at the overshoot point is a function of the critical strain unit. POLYM. ENG. SCI., 2011. © 2010 Society of Plastics Engineers

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