Hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber and hindered phenol composite. II. Characterization of hydrogen bonding

Authors

  • Yuanyi Cao,

    1. Polymer Alloy Lab, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Meilong Road, Shanghai, 200237, People's Republic of China
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  • Haiyan Mou,

    1. Polymer Alloy Lab, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Meilong Road, Shanghai, 200237, People's Republic of China
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  • Fei Shen,

    1. Polymer Processing Institute, Guttenberg Information Technologies Center, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07032
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  • Haiyan Xu,

    1. Polymer Alloy Lab, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Meilong Road, Shanghai, 200237, People's Republic of China
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  • Guo-Hua Hu,

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratoire des Sciences du Génie Chimique, Nancy-Université, CNRS, 1 rue Grandville, Nancy 54001, France
    2. Institut Universitaire de France, Maison des Universités, Paris 75005, France
    • Laboratoire des Sciences du Génie Chimique, Nancy-Université, CNRS, 1 rue Grandville, Nancy 54001, France
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  • Chifei Wu

    1. Polymer Alloy Lab, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Meilong Road, Shanghai, 200237, People's Republic of China
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Abstract

This article reports on the relationship between the variation of hydrogen bonding and macroscopic properties of composites composed of hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) and 3,9-bis {1,1-dimethyl-2 [β-(3-tert-butyl-4-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl) propionyloxy] ethyl}-2,4,8,10-tetraoxaspiro [5,5]-undecane (AO-80). Hydrogen bonding of the composites was studied by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopies. FT-IR spectra at room temperature revealed that the stretching vibration peak of O[BOND]H and C[DOUBLE BOND]O of AO-80 red shifted with increasing AO-80 content, whereas that of C≡N of HNBR blue shifted only when the AO-80 content exceeded 10 parts per 100 resin (phr). At elevated temperatures, the shift was the opposite for C[DOUBLE BOND]O and C≡N bands resulting from hydrogen bonding dissociation. In the UV spectra, the E2 band of benzene ring of AO-80 exhibited two peaks differing in shape. POLYM. ENG. SCI., 2011. © 2010 Society of Plastics Engineers

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