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Experimental analyses of the poly(vinyl chloride) foams' mechanical anisotropic behavior

Authors

  • Volnei Tita,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Aeronautical Engineering, Engineering School of São Carlos, University of São Paulo, São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil
    • Department of Aeronautical Engineering, Engineering School of São Carlos, University of São Paulo, São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil
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  • Mauricio Francisco Caliri Júnior,

    1. Department of Aeronautical Engineering, Engineering School of São Carlos, University of São Paulo, São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil
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  • Ricardo Afonso Angélico,

    1. Department of Aeronautical Engineering, Engineering School of São Carlos, University of São Paulo, São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil
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  • Rodrigo Bresciani Canto

    1. Department of Material Engineering, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil
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Abstract

Assessing a full set of mechanical properties is a rather complicate task in the case of foams, especially if material models must be calibrated with these results. Many issues, for example anisotropy and heterogeneity, influence the mechanical behavior. This article shows through experimental analyses how the microstructure affects different experimental setups and it also quantifies the degree of anisotropy of a poly(vinyl chloride) foam. Monotonic and cyclic experimental tests were carried out using standard compression specimens and non-standard tensile specimens. Results are complemented and compared with the aid of a digital image correlation technique and scanning electron microscopy analyses. Mechanical properties (e.g., elastic and plastic Poisson's ratios) are evaluated for compression and tensile tests, for two different material directions (normal and in-plane). The material is found to be transversely isotropic. Differences in the results of the mechanical properties can be as high as 100%, or even more depending on the technique used and the loading direction. Also, the experimental analyses show how the material's microstructure behavior, like the evolution of the herein identified “yield fronts” and a “spring back” phenomenon, can influence the phenomenological response and the failure mechanisms as well as the hardening curves. POLYM. ENG. SCI., 2012. © 2012 Society of Plastics Engineers

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